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  • By Gabriella Miller

Euphoria


I cut my finger, the sanguine smell

Permeates the air like petrichor.

The blood flows slow like caramel

Delighting in its long encore.


My clothes wear me like gossamer,

And I choke the sea with my bare hands.

They ask me which would I prefer:

Hell, high water, or wonderland.


My loneliness is fast renewed,

The poisoned air perfumed with death.

Like a hummingbird, I crave solitude

And in seven minutes I take seven breaths.


I hear my heart beat like a lullaby

That ticks away its lifelong debt.

A sound that subtly signifies

Each epoch until the next sunset.


The red sun is my paragon,

Both somber and ephemeral.

It sinks into oblivion

Like flowers yielding to my cull.


This world loves pandemonium,

In everything I see dysphoria.

Like novocaine my thoughts go numb—

And this is my euphoria.


Gabriella Miller has a BA in English Literature from the University of Vermont. She is an avid reader and writer, and lives in Vermont with her parents and two cats.


Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commmons User ForestWander

4 commentaires


jm6783685
jm6783685
15 sept. 2021

This poem relates to Sylvia Plath's 'Cut' but is much better. It is less hysterical and sensationalist and more thoughtful and philosophical. Also her rhythms are more interesting than those of Emily Dickinson. So in both cases she has improved on her influences. Brava!

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jm6783685
jm6783685
10 sept. 2021

Her parents and two cats are lucky. This is a very good poem. It is full of wonderful things. And every word tells. 'My clothes wear me like gossamer', and something about a 'long encore' stand out. After that there are so many good things I get lost. Normally I don't like words like 'petrichor' and 'caramel'. But in this case it doesn't seem to matter. Why? Because they work. They are not put there for decoration or to impress but because they are the best words for the job. We want a slightly clinical and scientifically objective word here where 'petrichor' asserts its peculiar charm. And the irony of 'caramel' in this instance is added to the exactness o…


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David Gosselin
David Gosselin
11 sept. 2021
En réponse à

”Normally I don't like words like 'petrichor' and 'caramel'. But in this case it doesn't seem to matter. Why? They are not put there for decoration or to impress but because they are the best words for the job.”


That’s a very good point. The poet is not writing to show off, or trying to use highly stylized language to create some novel effect based on word choice. Each line and image comes together to serve a purpose.

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martinmccarthy1956
martinmccarthy1956
10 sept. 2021

Lovely control of all stanzas. Something memorable in each.

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